Home Inspection and Real Estate Forum for Home Inspectors and Real Estate Professionals
  [Search] Search   [Recent Topics] Recent Topics   [Hottest Topics] Hottest Topics  
[Register] Register / 
[Login] Login 
Messages posted by: Mike Casey
Forum Index » Profile for Mike Casey » Messages posted by Mike Casey
Author Message
Dave:
30-40 degrees slope is pretty steep (I presume descending). The retaining wall may have been required since the bottom of the house foundation footing imaginary line at 45 degrees would daylight through the slope. Did the inspector think the retaining wall was an issue? The below link should help explain the daylight theory.

Thank you.

https://up.codes/s/footings-on-or-adjacent-to-slopes
Make sure the reinforcing steel is center of the concrete, not at the bottom. Good luck!
We don't know the conditions present the day of the inspection. Maybe email this to the inspector and ask about the items.
This sounds like door is merely access for maintenance of the roof and it was not designed as a traffic deck (leisure deck) and probably not structurally framed as such. Installing a permanent guardrail at the door opening is probably the best solution.
One other item to check is the garbage disposal, if you have one. Sometimes they get rather nasty inside and smell after use, especially with hot water.
Its almost impossible to make diagnoses and recommendations based solely upon text, and we don't know the location, climate or soil conditions, etc. As you say, the house is old and that won't change. I would say never expect any basement to be waterproof. Hard to say why the exhaust fans, but I would expect you are correct, the provide air flow throuh the basement. If you are really interested best action would be to hire an experienced inspector to review the property with you.
Enrico:

This is more a question for a Veterans Administration appraiser, not home inspectors. I suggest you contact your local VA office for some clarity.

Thank you.
That's not a flood as there's no line on the walls. It's from tank sweating due to cold water and dirt.
Andrew: I would suggest following the inspector advice. First, termites in CA are normal, be sure to get a pest control inspection and follow that advice, if any. Regarding the drainage, it apparently needs some maintenance to help prevent water under the house so a landscaper or engineer can assist there. Lastly, the spacer blocks. I am not sure what the inspector is referring to here, this looks like a grade beam and pier foundation and soil level should not effect the beam. However, I have not seen it so I would recommend an engineer take a look at the foundation and the drainage.
Depending upon the instructions for the cosmetic logs a flexible connector is probably okay. However, that looks like two connectors in series which would not be okay. Reasonably easy fix for a plumber.
The engineered beam (looks like a Timberlam or Microlam) surface defect is normal, looks like stitching. The stud is a low grade material and missing some width as it looks like it was milled from the edge of the log. Just one is probably not a big deal, and there is a competent stud nearby, once again not a big deal, however, most of us would not have used that stud for framing a bearing wall.
Thank you.
I would suggest a second opinion. I see equipment grounds in the photo. If there are 6 or less disconnects to de-energize the home no main was required in older homes. Often tradespeople apply new codes to old homes when in fact compliance with modern codes is not required for existing systems. New work will most likely need to be "permit-ed" and comply with modern requirements. Thank you.
Sherry:

We don't know the circumstances of the home inspection or your local standard of care. What I can see in the photo are typical conditions found in older panels. It looks like several of the grounded conductors (white insulation) need separation into their own terminal slots. Additionally, most panels allow 2, and some 3, equipment grounds (bare copper) in a terminal slot. Seems one or more need correction. This was commonly done until about 15 or so years ago when the NEC became specific regarding terminal slot loading for grounded conductors and grounds and the limitations. It's an easy fix for an electrician.
Sherry:

We don't know the circumstances of the home inspection or your local standard of care. What I can see in the photo are typical conditions found in older panels. It looks like several of the grounded conductors (white insulation) need separation into their own terminal slots. Additionally, most panels allow 2, and some 3, equipment grounds (bare copper) in a terminal slot. Seems one or more need correction. This was commonly done until about 15 or so years ago when the NEC became specific regarding terminal slot loading for grounded conductors and grounds and the limitations. It's an easy fix for an electrician.
Kalamay: Every house will get some interior settlement and or thermal/moisture movement cracking. The defining factor is how much. Sounds like you made your decision and another house will come along most likely even better. I am not sure what the plugs are for based upon the photos.
Thank you.
 
Forum Index » Profile for Mike Casey » Messages posted by Mike Casey
Go to:   
© 2014 Inspector Services Group